Einstein


The huge head of Albert Einstein in a park that bears his name in Panama City, Panama in the neighborhood of El Cangrejo. Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.

“All of science is nothing more than refinement of everyday thinking.”—Quoted in interview by G.S. Viereck, 1929

“Today, the practical applications of Einstein’s theories include the development of the television, remote control devices, automatic door openers, lasers, and DVD-players.

Recognized as TIME magazine’s “Person of the Century” in 1999, Einstein’s intellect, coupled his strong passion for social justice and dedication to pacifism, left the world with infinite knowledge and pioneering moral leadership.”

Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.

Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.

“In 1905, while working as a patent clerk in Bern, Switzerland, Einstein had what came to be known as his “Annus Mirabilis” — or “miracle year”. It was during this time that the young physicist obtained his Doctorate degree and published four of his most influential research papers, including the Special Theory of Relativity. In that, the now world famous equation “e = mc2” unlocked mysteries of the Universe theretofore unknown.”

Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.

Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.

E=mc2 is an equation derived by the twentieth-century physicist Albert Einstein, in which E represents units of energy, m represents units of mass, and c 2 is the speed of light squared, or multiplied by itself.

It is the most famous equation in the world. Many can recite it—and attribute it to Albert Einstein—but few know its significance.

It tells us that mass and energy are related, and, in those rare instances where mass is converted totally into energy, how much energy that will be. The elegance with which it ties together three disparate parts of nature—energy, the speed of light and mass—is profound.

Because the speed of light is a very large number and is multiplied by itself, this equation points out how a small amount of matter can release a huge amount of energy, as in a nuclear reaction.  It is a beautiful equation.  In such a short equation you can fill entire libraries of information about the Universe.

Good Day!

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