The Crystal House


 “I M., take thee N., to be my wedded Wife, to have and to hold from this day forward, for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death us do part, according to God’s holy ordinance; and thereto I plight thee my troth.”

Some people with special personalities like to pronounce the words, “I do, I do” in the most remote and exotic places.  For example, some people decide to get married exactly on the North Pole in the midst of polar bears and Eskimos.  Others prefer to tie the knot while descending on a parachute, or on the bottom of the ocean, or in the heights of Mount Everest, or in the middle of the Sahara Desert, or inside a salt cathedral underground, or an ice chapel in Iceland.   Yep, marriage makes people take the most odd decisions.  After all it’s one of the most important decisions of your life.

During a short visit to the highlands of the Province of Chiriqui, I happened into a gorgeous glass house.  It’s used for several purposes, among them for marriages and matrimonial festivities.  I had never seen a crystal house before, and it baffled my imagination getting married in the middle of a coffee plantation flanked by high mist forests inside a glass house.  The place is Hotel Finca Lérida in Alto Boquete, one of the most beautiful sites in the Isthmus of Panama.

Pictures of course describe better than words, so I inserted several photographs of this gorgeous crystal house in the middle of a coffee plantation in Alto Boquete.  Disneyland pales in comparison.

Photograph of a crystal house inside the premises of Hotel Finca Lérida in Alto Boquete.  It's a perfect venue to marry the woman or man of your dreams.  Credit:  Hotel Finca Lérida
Photograph of a crystal house inside the premises of Hotel Finca Lérida in Alto Boquete. It’s a perfect venue to marry the woman or man of your dreams. Credit: Hotel Finca Lérida
Credit:  Hotel Finca Lérida in Alto Boquete, Panama.
Credit: Hotel Finca Lérida in Alto Boquete, Panama.
Photograph of a beautiful snow-white cake inside the crystal house during a matrimony ceremony.  Credit:  Hotel Finca Lérida, Alto Boquete, Panama.
Photograph of a beautiful snow-white cake inside the crystal house during a matrimony ceremony. Credit: Hotel Finca Lérida, Alto Boquete, Panama.
Flower decorations inside the glass house during a matrimony event inside the glass house.  Credit:  Finca Lérida in Alto Boquete, Panama.
Flower decorations inside the glass house during a matrimony event inside the glass house. Credit: Finca Lérida in Alto Boquete, Panama.

Is this the enchanted place where you want to get married? No problem, hop into a plane, come on down to Panama,  and head for the mountains of Alto Boquete where love and magic reigns.  Good Day and enjoy your marriage.

2 thoughts on “The Crystal House”

  1. Wow! That’s quite an establishment. And I must say – it’s far more attractive than the vaunted Crystal Cathedral out in California. I’m not sure that’s even still standing. I suppose it is. I vaguely remember an earthquake taking out some windows. Anyway – that building is tacky. This one isn’t.

  2. Hi Linda:

    I “googled” the Crystal Cathedral and this is what I found out. The building is still standing, only changed ownership. It’s now owned by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange County in California.

    “Since its construction the building has been the principal place of worship for Crystal Cathedral Ministries, a congregation of the Reformed Church in America founded in 1955 by Robert H. Schuller.

    Crystal Cathedral Ministries filed for bankruptcy in October 2010 and in February 2012 sold the building and its adjacent campus to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange for future use as the diocese’s new cathedral. Under the terms of the sale, the building and most of the campus will continue to be used by Crystal Cathedral Ministries for up to three years before being renovated for use as a Roman Catholic cathedral.

    In June 2012, the diocese announced that Christ Cathedral is the intended new name for the church”

    The Glass House is a removable structure. When it’s not in use, its partitions are removed and stored in a safe place to protect the heavy-duty transparent plastic.

    Warm Regards,

    Omar.-

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