Feeds:
Posts
Comments

A man enjoying a cigarette in the Chinese neighborhood of El Dorado in Panama City, Panama. Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.


Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.

Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.

Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.

Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.

Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.

Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.

Entrapped


A man entrapped by urban development out of control in Panama City, Panama. His hands seem to be handcuffed to his back as he looks in anguish for help at the woman in the background.  Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.


Dials of my Fujifilm X-30 mirrorless camera and the shutter button with a bright red cap on top. The cap looks so darn cool. Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.


I’ve noticed a new trend in Panama regarding higher education.  During the last five years there has been a growing trend of building new and more modern college campuses.

The latest one is a few blocks away from our house in Via Ricardo J. Alfaro.  The name of the college is “Universidad Interamericana de Panamá” (UIP).  Bill Clinton gave a speech to the students here during the recently held Latin American Summit.  Another college is being built even as we speak.  This is good for the country.

Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.

Photo by Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.

UIP is part of the international education consortium known as Laureate International Universities.  Good Day.


Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.

Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.

The community of ethnic Chinese in Panama began to form in the latter half of the 19th century. The first group of Chinese labourers arrived in the country on March 30, 1854 by way of Canada and Jamaica to work on the Panama Railroad. By the early 20th century, they had already come to play a crucial role in other sectors of the economy as well; they owned over 600 retail stores, and the entire country was said to depend on provisions from their stores.

As of 2003, there were estimated to be between 135,000 and 200,000 Chinese in Panama, making them the largest Chinese community in Central America; they are served by thirty-five separate ethnic representative organisations.

Their numbers include 80,000 new immigrants from mainland China and 300 from Taiwan; 99 percent are of Cantonese-speaking origin, although Mandarin and Hakka speakers are represented among newer arrivals. In the aftermath of the Tianamen Square protests of 1989, many mainland Chinese fled to Panama by way of Hong Kong on temporary visas and short-term residency permits; estimates of the size of the influx ranged from 9,000 to 35,000.

The latest wave of immigrants are less educated than earlier arrivals, and their presence has caused internal tensions within the Chinese community. Tensions have also arisen due to external factors; the government of the People’s Republic of China contends with the Republic of China on Taiwan for influence among the local Chinese community, hoping to gain formal diplomatic recognition from the Panamanian government. Both sides have funded the building of schools and other community facilities and donated millions of dollars worth of Chinese textbooks.Source:  Wikipedia Encyclopedia


Photo by ©Omar Upegui R.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 781 other followers